Suzhou dating

I’m going to start with some of the parks and gardens that we visited, and I’ll talk about some of the museums in another post, otherwise this’ll end up being incredibly long.

Let’s start with the most famous of Suzhou’s many gardens. w=620" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-19344" src="https://theidlewoman.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/2015-30_-_suzhou_garten_des_bescheidenen_beamten.jpg? w=620" alt="The Humble Administrator's Garden, Suzhou" srcset="https://theidlewoman.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/2015-30_-_suzhou_garten_des_bescheidenen_beamten.jpg?

Suzhou, a city of just over 8 million inhabitants, is the historic silk capital of China.

It is about 20 minutes’ train journey northwest of Shanghai.

It’s considered to be the “Venice of the East.” Here’s why.

Its development model is based on the principles of strong government support, extension of higher education provision by existing providers, market-orientation collective out-sourcing of logistical support and professional management.

Being an integral part of the Yangtze River Delta area, the city has a rich history dating back more than 2,500 years.

It is the home of Sun Zi, and the setting for his Art of War philosophy and book.

In different parts of the city, you feel like you’re stepping back into another era.

There are public gardens once belonging to prominent families or government officials; waterways still used for getting from one point to another; stone bridges that can walked over; and streets dating back centuries lined up with markets and teahouses. Built during the Ming Dynasty, the Humble Administrator’s Garden once belonged to a Chinese government worker, who saw this place as a way to retire to a more simpler life.